A Brand Ambassador’s Guide to Field Marketing—Creating Brand Loyalty and Building Consumer Relationships. 

By Anna Guilford 

Happiness is the only emotion you can wear on your sleeve…

        As brand ambassadors, our job is to associate the brand we work for with a smile and a friendly attitude for the consumer, an interaction they will remember every time they see our brand. A consumer’s reasoning to purchase a product can be a completely subconscious, meaning if the consumer has had a positive interaction with an ambassador at an event or an in store demo, they are going to be more likely to buy our product over another brand and continue their brand loyalty because of the positive feeling they associate our brand with.

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The key is working for a company who’s product/service you love and actually use…    

      First off, as a brand ambassador you get unlimited free product, so working for a company who’s product you love is definitely in your best interest. However, free product should not be the reason you work for a company, it is merely a perk of the job. Working for a company who’s mission, values and product you support will lay the foundation for your success with the company. It is much easier to rave about a product you love and use to a consumer than a product you have used once and don’t really like. It is extremely important to remember that nine times out of 10, consumers can tell when you’re lying. I always give a little anecdote if the consumer seems interested enough, something like “I love this snack, I always take it to school with me.” Those are the types of interactions that elicit a sort of a trial close; the consumer starts to picture themselves utilizing the product in their own lives by relating to you as the ambassador. 

Know your facts… I repeat, know your facts…

You never know everything about the company you are representing, research is your best friend when you are a brand ambassador. When you feel you have all the answers about your product, a consumer will ask you a question that will stump you, or will lead to a more detailed conversation and it WILL stump you, I promise. It is to your benefit and your company’s to know what you are talking about. Working for a healthy snack company that prides itself on having “ingredients you can see and pronounce,” being entirely gluten free, all natural and having a low glycemic index, I have received heat from skeptical consumers.  There are ALWAYS going to be people that doubt your brand; whether you’re representing food, clothing, makeup, alcohol, whatever it may be, people will want to challenge you. When this happens it is extremely important and satisfying to have knowledge beyond what the brand markets. For example, consumers love to question our choice to put palm oil in our products because harvesting this good can be a reason for deforestation and be done unethically for profit. When people ask, we have to know how to explain to the consumer how this oil was sustainably sourced and where. I have made many sales to consumers who are willing to try the product I am representing based solely on the fact that I knew information beyond what they expected me to. It impresses consumers and makes them feel that they are making a good investment because knowledge is transparency. 

Don’t be afraid to be told no…

      Representing a company in the field can be intimidating at times. However, you are in the field for a reason, your company is relying on you to be the face of proof of their consumer interaction. You cannot be afraid to ask for what you want. I have asked music artist Jack Johnson, pro volleyball player Kerri Walsh-Jennings and Real Housewife of Orange County Gretchen Rossi for photos with me holding my product at events, sure it was horribly intimidating because they’re famous, but it was 100 percent worth it and I got all three photos. The main point to remember whether it is a celebrity or just an average Joe at a sampling is that the worst thing that is going to happen is they say “No.” That’s it. Being told no doesn’t feel great but you need to be able to brush it off and move on to the next person. Odds are you are never going to see this person again, so get out there and ask for what you want. The risk takers and assertive ambassadors are the ones who find themselves with more opportunities for growth and tend to stand out from the crowd.